Life in the Old World (1).







17 comments:

  1. I love me some Albrecht Durer!

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  2. some some groovy stuff going on in these - and the bottom two are new to me ......

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  3. Morning all. These are all by Hieronymous Wierix, rather than Dürer, although, that said, it looks as if most of the Wierix family output were adaptations and copies of other people's works. The top, 'Knight, Death and the Devil' is an adaptation of the Dürer masterpiece. It was recently on display at the Wellcome Collection in London, but there aren't many good copies of it online.

    I should have just posted the original really.

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  4. The top one is so similar to the durer piece. Nice find . looking forward to this series :-)

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    1. Yeah, it's pretty much identical: I think he's just changed the face of death slightly, and it's facing the opposite direction, which means that he must have copied the image directly on to the print plate.

      The Devil's face in this (and the Dürer original) is brilliant! Such a weird creature.

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  5. Fantastic new serie, does this mean you are about ready to enter the Old World?

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  6. Durer's brilliant! There's a good reproduction of his original here: http://www.artinthepicture.com/artists/Albrecht_Durer/l-Knight-Death-and-the-Devil.jpg

    The second picture is particularly interesting, faceless hooded riders are pretty rare in imagery from that time and the hood itself is quite unusual too (at least by today's standards), makes you wonder if he's quite human under that fabric. The masks on the horse are also delightfully creepy.

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    1. Yes, indeed. They're a peculiar combination, too - Grief, Care and Treachery. I have little knowledge of Roman mythology, so have no idea what the image is actually about, but the figures are stunning, no? The masks are probably my favourite bit.

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    2. Sorrows of the World personified? I think it's probably an expansion on medieval memento mori themes (Danse Macabre and games of chess). Can't think of anything like that directly from Roman myth either.

      The third image by the way reminded me of an 19th century painting with a similar idea of a weird apocalyptic procession bearing down upon the world, can't recall the artist or the name of painting right now but will try and look it up later.

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    3. The final image reminds me very much of Steve Buddle's wondrous Corpse Cart:

      http://spyglassasylum.blogspot.co.uk/search?updated-max=2011-11-07T22:31:00Z&max-results=7&start=7&by-date=false

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  7. Great new series, wanted to comment the last few days but have been very busy. Those are some great pictures that really inspire a Slaaneshii feel. I hope to see some large "you know what" with masks hanging from their wastes and some extra boobage added...and a selection of animals running around their feet wanting to feed.

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    1. I have to work within my means, Peter! But yes, there are definitely bits of this that'll be used, I think.

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